Stylist Magazine Article about Anger Management, BAAM

Aaaaargh! We are a nation of hotheads who can’t get through one day without getting irate. In a bid to calm down, Stylist investigates anger management I knew I’d made a mistake the moment I pushed her. It was as if my arms had become separated from my body, fuelled by the heat rising from the pit of my stomach and spreading across my chest. Yes, we were both drunk, and yes, we were having a blazing row, but I was the one who made it physical. When I look back on that night I can see I was out of control. I’d never laid a hand on anyone before, let alone one of my oldest and dearest friends. And although it was only a shove, it was enough to dampen our friendship forever. This is not the only time I’ve given my mind over to anger. There have been thoughtless spiky comments which reduced my mother to tears; a close call with the LAPD after an argument with a bouncer on holiday (I told him he’d never satisfied a woman); and an entire five-year relationship that was blighted with snide, passive aggressive taunts. I look back on these occasions and feel physically sick (although I can raise a smile about the bouncer) because most of the things I regret in my life happened when I was angry. But I know I’ve got company. Picture how you felt the last time someone sidled in front of you at a bar. Or when you were on hold for 45 minutes, only to be passed between five people, just to get...

Is Hunger Making You Angry?

Do you get impatient when hungry and small things sets you off? Ever wondered why you find it hard to keep your temper under control when you haven’t eaten for a while? According to researchers at Cambridge University, when the body starts to feel hungry, levels of the brain chemical serotonin, dip, causing a whirlwind of uncontrollable emotions including anxiety, stress and anger. These fluctuating serotonin levels affect the brain regions that enable people to regulate anger, making us prone to aggression when hungry. The findings were discovered after researchers altered the volunteers’ diet, feeding them foods that affected the levels of serotonin, such as essential amino acid tryptophan, and then taking it away from their diet to monitor the change. Their brain reactions were then scanned after they viewed angry, sad and neutral facial expressions. The results showed that those with low serotonin levels communicated with the amygdala (the system that controls emotion in the brain). The researchers behind the study, which was recently published in the Biological Psychiatry Journal, hope that the results will help diagnose other psychiatric conditions. “We are hopeful that our research will lead to improved diagnostics as well as better treatments for this and other conditions,” says researcher Luca Passamonti. If you’re worried about your serotonin levels dropping, make sure you stock up on foods which boost your serotonin intake, such as pumpkin seeds, walnuts, avocado, dates, bananas and rolled oats. Keeping the hunger pangs at bay can be difficult, so check out these top 10 tips from Slimming World nutritionist Dr Jacquie Lavin on how to keep your serotonin levels high and feel fuller longer....

Is Road Rage making you Rage?

In light of a recent Daily Mirror newspaper article about road rage, let’s take a moment to look through the ‘Red Mist’ and see how you can beat it. It’s expected that whilst driving on our roads, an incident of road rage will happen at least once during the journey. Whether it’s having an angry looking man shaking their clutched fist at you, or being cut up by a speeding driver, whether it’s being honked at, or being given the single finger gesture; road rage is apart of everyday life. As the Daily Mirror article points out, ‘Road rage is growing worse with nearly half Britain’s drivers saying they had ­experienced the red mist.’   We each believe we are the best driver in the world. The next time a driver cuts you up, gives you the finger, shouts or shakes their fist, smile and think, ‘Perhaps there’s an emergency in their life which they must attend to.’ After all, any number of situations could be at play in that driver’s life.   Five easy ways to beat Road-Rage Avoid eye contact. In much the same way you wouldn’t look a raging bull in the eyes, avoid looking at a road rage driver in the eyes too, especially while the red mist clouds their senses. It’s best to avoid any engagement and if you do find yourself face-to-face, smile and apologize and in doing so, you will defuse the situation. Change lanes and let the road-rager pass. Remember they may be in an emergency. Refrain from doing to them, what they do to you. Good biblical advice which applies to...

Heat waves and anger!

Heat-waves and anger! The whole country is basking in a heat-wave. The beaches are full, the parks packed and the sales of ice cream are going through the roof. But is this heat-wave leaving people cool calm and collected or is it leaving them hot under the collar and ready to blow? A person’s level of anger and stress is a response to their environment. Police chiefs and medical staff are more than aware of this as heat-waves are associated with an increase in violent crime. But how do heat-waves affect families and individuals? As the temperature gets hotter, so do our tempers. Summer heat-waves make us act like cranky, whiny toddlers, ready to lash out and apportion blame. Any doctor would explain that an increase in body temperature causes an increase in physical arousal – your heart rate goes up and your blood pressure rises as your body tries to cool itself off. Its all very well sitting by the seaside, licking an ice-lolly and sipping a cool drink, but for many of us, heat-waves mean being uncomfortable, irritable and more prone than ever, to anger and stress Normally congenial folks seem to be simmering, while others are on a slow burn. Hotter heads are steaming, and a few have even been pushed to the boiling point. Health officials are warning people to take care as the UK continues to bake in a prolonged heat-wave, with special attention being paid towards the very young children, elderly people and pregnant women. When it’s very hot, people have a tendency to get dehydrated or under-hydrated, and that can certainly result in becoming...

Depression and Aggression

It’s common practice to greet friends, colleagues and family with the opening question, ‘How are you today?’ More often than not we reply with the short answer, ‘OK’. Even if you are feeling depressed, would you admit it? If you are feeling sad or miserable; is it common to share these feelings? More often than not, we are prone to answer ‘OK’ rather than be open about our inner emotions But is it healthy to keep such emotions bottled up? Can depression lead to aggression? In its mildest form depression can mean just being in low spirits. To its most extreme, it makes you feel suicidal. Being depressed doesn’t stop you leading a normal life. Thousands of sufferers carry on with life regardless, with the only symptoms being mood swings, bouts of annoyance and feelings of hopelessness. Aggression makes an appearance as a consequence of depression. It’s there under the surface ready to show its head in the most unwanted of occasions. How often do you see mild mannered individuals grimace for no apparent reason? Or clutch their fists tight or even hit the wall or kick an object out of sight? Whether it’s uncontrollable anger towards oneself or outward aggression toward others, whether a person or object, it’s clinically proven that depression and aggression run hand in hand.   What to look out for? Symptoms of depression vary from person to person, though common threads do appear across the board. Feelings of sadness and gloom can either make you sleep too much or not sleep enough. If your sleeping pattern is being disturbed, it’s a sign. Do simple...
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