National Anger Awareness Month – December 2014

National Anger Awareness Month – December 2014

  About National Anger Awareness Month For many years, BAAM has promoted the National Anger Awareness Week as the first week of December with the aim to help and support people in the lead up to Christmas. This year, we’re doing things differently. We’ve decided to make it Anger Awareness Month so that people can access information and help in understanding the underlying causes of anger and equip themselves to reduce their own or another’s anger in an effective way, especially during the season when demands can become even more extreme. Mike Fisher, founder of BAAM and author of the self-help book Beating Anger, explains: “It almost seems impossible to have Christmas without a row these days. Someone’s fed-up in the kitchen, we can be over-loaded at work, everyone wants something different on the TV, relationships with partners and families are under the microscope, the kids are playing up and your parents-in-law are coming to stay… it’s a stressful time.” National Anger Awareness Month encourages everyone to prepare themselves with simple coping strategies to create an atmosphere of calm and co-operation.  To this end, we have created the ‘Keep Your Cool Over Yule Kit‘. Of course, what you learn from the Kit can be used at any time of year to help deal with those difficult emotions. “National Anger Awareness Month is all about learning to take control of your behaviour. Everyone feels angry at some time; what matters is what you choose to do with it”   Keep Your Cool Over Yule Kit As part of Anger Awareness Month (December 2014), we are giving away our updated Keep Your...
Why do we get so angry?

Why do we get so angry?

Source: Telegraph After going postal over a pretzel in Waitrose, one writer realised she had to find a new way to handle living with her anger towards her ex-boyfriend. Harsh words, long sulks or full-on tantrums – we all express our anger differently. Of course, the adult approach to dealing with something that irks us is to sit down and “talk things through” with the person doing the irking. But how many of us possess such maturity? If you’re anything like me, the minute something doesn’t go your way you’re inclined to throw yourself on the floor and kick and scream like a child denied her favourite toy. The last time I did that was when they ran out of my favourite pretzels in Waitrose. The poor security man thought I was having an epileptic fit. Of course, I wouldn’t ordinarily overreact to such a trivial nuisance this way. But my temper had been tested in recent weeks. The cause? My ex-boyfriend Adam – the once darling of my life who’d dumped me unceremoniously earlier this year. In truth, I’d seen the break-up coming. Our laughter-filled conversations on the sofa had dissolved into one-word exchanges in the hallway. We’d grown apart. But still, when he came home and announced that he wanted to end our eight-year relationship in February, it was a huge blow. The second wallop came when he told me he’d continue to live with me in our two-bedroom Victorian conversion flat until it sold. “What, you mean we’re going to be … flatmates?” I asked disbelievingly. “Yes,” he smiled. “Why not?” It was absurd. None of...

What is Emotional Quotient?

While it is often misunderstood as intelligence quotient (IQ), Emotional Quotient is different because instead of measuring your general intelligence, it measures your emotional intelligence. Emotional Quotient is the ability to sense, understand and effectively apply the power and acumen of emotions to facilitate high levels of collaboration and productivity. In the business environment, Emotional Quotient is important because it helps you leverage your awareness of emotions for effectiveness in the workplace.   Why is emotional intelligence (EQ) so important? As we know, it’s not the smartest people that are the most successful or the most fulfilled in life. You probably know people who are academically brilliant and yet are socially inept and unsuccessful at work or in their personal relationships. Intellectual intelligence (IQ) isn’t enough on its own to be successful in life. Yes, your IQ can help you get into college, but it’s your EQ that will help you manage the stress and emotions when facing your final exams.   Emotional intelligence affects: Your performance at work. Emotional intelligence can help you navigate the social complexities of the workplace, lead and motivate others, and excel in your career. In fact, when it comes to gauging job candidates, many companies now view emotional intelligence as being as important as technical ability and require EQ testing before hiring. Your physical health. If you’re unable to manage your stress levels, it can lead to serious health problems. Uncontrolled stress can raise blood pressure, suppress the immune system, increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, contribute to infertility, and speed up the aging process. The first step to improving emotional intelligence is...

Why do I resist doing an Anger Management Programme?

Why do I resist doing an Anger Management Programme, even though I know it could potentially be a healthier option for me and as a result, beneficial to my family, work and overall well-being? A friend posted an interesting Facebook up-date today. It went something like this: ‘Somehow we lost 9 pairs of gloves at school last term which resulted in an almighty tantrum on my part on school property. My one New Year Resolution was not to erupt when we lost another. 6 days back and both boys have lost a pair !! I’m doing Vesuvius internally which isn’t a good look! Tips please ? Surely a pair on a ribbon going through the coat is no longer age appropriate!!! Grrrrrrrr &@£!’ She’s a dear friend and she’s crying out for help. She’s not erupting like a volcano on the outside but holding it all in. She thinks that if she finds a fool-proof way to keep the gloves save, her anger will disappear in a puff of smoke. But she’s wrong. As I wrote in reply, ‘It has nothing to with the gloves but everything to do with your anger.’ Let’s see how she responds. Having known her for 20 years, I expect she’ll initially be confused…“I haven’t got anger issues, I’m just mad that I’ve lost ten pairs of gloves, that’s all!” The reason she’s imploding like a volcano internally isn’t about the gloves, it’s about something else that either happened weeks, days or hours ago. It’s the throw-away comment her husband said weeks ago that’s been chipping at her ever since. It’s the tut her...
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