Fatigue, Stress and Irritability

Fatigue, Stress and Irritability

    You should be able to feel refreshed and revitalised after a decent nights sleep, being able to work the whole day without agitation. After a long hard day at work it is natural to feel tired but in a pleasant way, especially if your job has high job satisfaction. We need to feel like we have a purpose and that we have actually achieved something. Normal fatigue will disappear after a good night’s sleep so you are ready to repeat the next day. However, for a person experiencing fatigue or exhaustion as a result of long-term stress the daily cycle of work and sleep becomes a struggle as they are incapable of relaxing and always feel like they are lacking energy. When you are stressed you do not wake up feeling refreshed and revitalised. Someone experiencing fatigue is fighting a daily battle to keep forcing a smile and enduring the regular stress, whilst all the while the stress and tension is building. When an exhausted person is close to giving up, they may seem irritable or agitated. They have had enough of themselves, their job, their workplace and their family. Everything. There seems like there are not enough hours in the day and they are never getting enough sleep. It all seems too much for one people to handle by himself or herself. Here at BAAM we have a few tips for handling stress. If it does get too much talk to your therapist or join us on one of our Calming Strategy Days (http://www.calmingstrategy.com/) Tips for handling stress and irritability: Nothing beats a hug. When you...
Heartbreak and Pain

Heartbreak and Pain

Your brain is drowned in dopamine and oxytocin the “happy chemicals” or neurotransmitters of the brain. When the relationship comes to an end, the happy chemicals leave your system and are replaced by cortisol, adrenaline and epinephrine the stress chemicals. The stress of the break up takes the body into fight or flight mode.   No wonder you feel so down after a breakup. Too much cortisol can lead to too much blood being deposited to your muscles. This causes muscular tenseness preparing your body for action. Unfortunately no action is actually required. This can cause tenderness and sensitivity in your muscles due to prolonged contraction, headaches, stomach cramps and chest pains.   Your brain believes that you’re physically hurt, as the same area of the brain is activated when you are physically injured and when you suffer from social rejection, in this case heartbreak. This is because emotional and physical pain share the same neural pathways in the brain. In an experiment, participants were told to look at photos of their friends, along with positive thoughts and then they were told to look at photos of their ex causing them to relive their breakup. During a brain scan the same participants felt a pain on their forearms, equal to holding a hot cup of coffee. The same areas became active in physical and emotional turmoil.   Love can be just as addictive as drugs, so it is not surprising that just as a drug addict gets withdrawals, after a breakup it’s natural to be experiencing withdrawals from your previous significant other.   It is not usual for someone...
Why Does Being Rejected Make Us Angry?

Why Does Being Rejected Make Us Angry?

    There is no denying that rejection hurts, but why is it that it brings up feelings of anger?   Feeling loved and accepted is a primary human need and when you feel rejected you are being denied just that. When you are rejected, it can cause the same feeling as physical pain. This is because rejection activates the same areas of the brain as physical pain. Physical pain has been seen to provoke an anger response, for example, rats that were given an electric shock have gone on to randomly attack other rats.   When people feel devalued or rejected it is natural to become angry as you feel that the other person is not taking your wants and needs seriously. By being ignored or excluded, the message portrayed is that you’re not worth another person’s time. This feeling is disheartening, especially if you are emotionally invested in the other individual.   If you feel that the other person is not giving you as much affection as you would like, despite the fact that you appreciate that you are valued and accepted by the other person, you may feel rejected. The amount of pain felt is based on how much value you give your relationship.   However, other than relational value, there are apparent individual differences in anger and one factor that may influence aggression is the fact that some people are simply more sensitive to rejection.   Several experimental studies have looked into this apparent connection between anger and rejection. The experimenters manipulate the participants into believing that the other participants had rejected them or making...
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