Anger and Addiction

Anger and Addiction

    Anger is often the root of an addict’s problem. Unfortunately, substance abusers, drug addicts and alcoholics do not identify their anger as connected to their addiction. This is problematic as since they do not recognise anger as the psychological origin of their addiction they are not able to seek help for this particular aspect of their disorder. Anger is the emotional anguish we experience when we feel unfulfilled. Anger is often the emotional predecessor of the misuse of cocaine and alcohol. To avoid this anguish and suffering and to relieve themselves of the pain they are feeling they abuse substances until they are emotionally numb. Unfortunately, this is not expressing their anger but suppressing it. People who suppress their anger often end up exploding and/ or experiencing depression. Suppressed anger is the anger that is swept under the carpet or pushed down to deal with another day. This suppression of anger means that aside from the addiction, the addict now has another problem to be diagnosed, depression. Many clinical studies have used anger management as a successful intervention for reducing or preventing a relapse of the substance abuse. This is because most frequently anger is a relapse trigger. This is due to the suppression of anger leading the individual to explode, leaving the addict in their red mist, thinking irrationally, and leaving them vulnerable to a relapse and return to substance abuse. During this time it is frequently reported that individuals decide that they want to punish other people or that they do not care about their own wellbeing. They very quickly forget their efforts to construct...
Do violent video games influence anger?

Do violent video games influence anger?

    We live in a society which seems to promote anger, violence and aggression.  We cannot go a day where we look at our social media feeds and not see something violent. Action movies and programmes involving violence are becoming more prevalent. And we as a society are exposing our children to violence as a result.  In this day and age it is hard to protect your child from the aggression and violence of this world. When they go to school they discuss the action packed film they saw at the cinema over the weekend or the fight that they saw on their Facebook feed. But one thing you can control is the violence that you expose your child to within your own home. It has been established by Bandura that exposure to violent role models increases aggression in children, in comparison to those children who were exposed to non-aggressive role models or no role model at all. This is true for ‘live,’ filmed and cartoon role models. This means that the films or programmes your child watches can influence their behaviour. It is well established that violent video games increase aggression. There is greater evidence of short-term effects from violent video games than of long-term effects. However, Hasan, Begue, Scharkow & Bushman (2013) conducted an experiment to look for the long term effects of violent video games. They found that over days the violent games players displayed an increase in aggressive behaviour, whereas those playing nonviolent video game showed no increase of aggressive behaviour. On the other hand it has been suggested that aggressive feelings post-gaming could...
Are Women Getting Angrier or More Comfortable Expressing Anger?

Are Women Getting Angrier or More Comfortable Expressing Anger?

    Historically, women have not been able or allowed to express their feelings due to their submissive roles. Therefore it comes as a surprise to many men when a woman gets angry, despite the fact that we live in the 21st century. Anger is an expression of hurt so, naturally, every woman will feel it but they will express it in different ways. As many women have suppressed their anger for a period of time, this can potentially lead to a build-up of problems and then she can explode. In the past this was wholly unacceptable, as a woman must contain her anger. However, women are getting more comfortable expressing their anger, even if society is not. There are many things that can contribute to a women’s anger. Generally as teens, young women are generally not treated well by men or society, often getting treated like objects or being used and potentially abused, leading them to believe that they are not worthy of love, a is a primary human need. This can mean that the relationship that they often crave so much will usually be of a poor quality, diminishing their self-esteem. This often results in an ‘inward’ anger which is often the root of depression. Another factor in a female’s anger is her upbringing, including her relationship with her father. If her father withholds affection she will crave it from other men, if this is the case she may report low relationship satisfaction when trying to find a partner. Another relationship relevant to female anger is that of her parents. She will either resent or want to...
Britain is Getting Angrier

Britain is Getting Angrier

    Britain is getting angrier. Which is not surprising as our media seems to encourage violence. We, as a society, have welcomed violence and aggression into our home in the form of DVDs, social media content and video games, where the reoccurring theme is that violence and aggression is acceptable.   Bandura’s (1963) popular study on aggression and role model behaviour saw that children who were exposed to an aggressive role model behaved more aggressively than those children who were exposed to either a non-aggressive role model or no role model at all.   80% of people believe Britain is becoming angrier and this anger is spilling out into our professional lives, our daily commute and even our most intimate relationships. 45% of staff regularly lose their temper at work. This could be because of a demanding workload and increasing stress levels or it could be due to the fact that 53% of people have been the victims of bullying at work. Both bullying and increased stress levels have a detrimental effect on anger and the (usually unhealthy) way it is expressed.   Not surprisingly Britain is the top road rage country within the European Union with 80.4% of drivers claiming to have been involved in road rage incidents; another 1 in 4 drivers admit to committing an act of road rage. There was an astonishing 400% increase in air rage between 1997 and 2000. It is shocking that we seem to be ok or more comfortable communicating our hurt and anger in every way but face to face. 65% of people are likely to express anger over...
Abandonment and Anger

Abandonment and Anger

    If you suffer from anger issues, it could be due to the rage that you feel from being abandoned. This anger has the goal of revenge on everyone in the surrounding world because your physical and emotional needs were not met. This anger wants to inflict revenge on any individual who has hurt you, either physically or emotionally.   It is not unusual for those attempting suicide to report that the suicide is a bid for revenge. “When I’m dead they’ll see, they’ll miss me when I’m gone and they will have to live with the guilt that my death is their fault.” Individuals often turn to drugs, alcoholism and sexual endeavours as an attempt to ignore or bury the real problem: their feelings of abandonment.   Those who have feelings of abandonment often struggle with relationships due to the rage felt. As soon as your significant other offends you, you become hurt, which manifests itself as anger. To cope with the pain, which caused the anger, you used a defence mechanism, and pushed them away, rejecting their love. By shutting yourself down emotionally, you exacted your revenge on those who had the potential to hurt you, by hiding how you feel. However, you will always feel misunderstood because you are not disclosing how you feel.   This defence mechanism may work in the short term, but in the long term you are doing more harm than good. By pushing everyone with the potential to hurt you away, you won’t get hurt, but at the same time you won’t feel loved, which is a primary human need....
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