Fatigue, Stress and Irritability

Fatigue, Stress and Irritability

    You should be able to feel refreshed and revitalised after a decent nights sleep, being able to work the whole day without agitation. After a long hard day at work it is natural to feel tired but in a pleasant way, especially if your job has high job satisfaction. We need to feel like we have a purpose and that we have actually achieved something. Normal fatigue will disappear after a good night’s sleep so you are ready to repeat the next day. However, for a person experiencing fatigue or exhaustion as a result of long-term stress the daily cycle of work and sleep becomes a struggle as they are incapable of relaxing and always feel like they are lacking energy. When you are stressed you do not wake up feeling refreshed and revitalised. Someone experiencing fatigue is fighting a daily battle to keep forcing a smile and enduring the regular stress, whilst all the while the stress and tension is building. When an exhausted person is close to giving up, they may seem irritable or agitated. They have had enough of themselves, their job, their workplace and their family. Everything. There seems like there are not enough hours in the day and they are never getting enough sleep. It all seems too much for one people to handle by himself or herself. Here at BAAM we have a few tips for handling stress. If it does get too much talk to your therapist or join us on one of our Calming Strategy Days (http://www.calmingstrategy.com/) Tips for handling stress and irritability: Nothing beats a hug. When you...
Heartbreak and Pain

Heartbreak and Pain

Your brain is drowned in dopamine and oxytocin the “happy chemicals” or neurotransmitters of the brain. When the relationship comes to an end, the happy chemicals leave your system and are replaced by cortisol, adrenaline and epinephrine the stress chemicals. The stress of the break up takes the body into fight or flight mode.   No wonder you feel so down after a breakup. Too much cortisol can lead to too much blood being deposited to your muscles. This causes muscular tenseness preparing your body for action. Unfortunately no action is actually required. This can cause tenderness and sensitivity in your muscles due to prolonged contraction, headaches, stomach cramps and chest pains.   Your brain believes that you’re physically hurt, as the same area of the brain is activated when you are physically injured and when you suffer from social rejection, in this case heartbreak. This is because emotional and physical pain share the same neural pathways in the brain. In an experiment, participants were told to look at photos of their friends, along with positive thoughts and then they were told to look at photos of their ex causing them to relive their breakup. During a brain scan the same participants felt a pain on their forearms, equal to holding a hot cup of coffee. The same areas became active in physical and emotional turmoil.   Love can be just as addictive as drugs, so it is not surprising that just as a drug addict gets withdrawals, after a breakup it’s natural to be experiencing withdrawals from your previous significant other.   It is not usual for someone...
National Anger Awareness Month – December 2014

National Anger Awareness Month – December 2014

  About National Anger Awareness Month For many years, BAAM has promoted the National Anger Awareness Week as the first week of December with the aim to help and support people in the lead up to Christmas. This year, we’re doing things differently. We’ve decided to make it Anger Awareness Month so that people can access information and help in understanding the underlying causes of anger and equip themselves to reduce their own or another’s anger in an effective way, especially during the season when demands can become even more extreme. Mike Fisher, founder of BAAM and author of the self-help book Beating Anger, explains: “It almost seems impossible to have Christmas without a row these days. Someone’s fed-up in the kitchen, we can be over-loaded at work, everyone wants something different on the TV, relationships with partners and families are under the microscope, the kids are playing up and your parents-in-law are coming to stay… it’s a stressful time.” National Anger Awareness Month encourages everyone to prepare themselves with simple coping strategies to create an atmosphere of calm and co-operation.  To this end, we have created the ‘Keep Your Cool Over Yule Kit‘. Of course, what you learn from the Kit can be used at any time of year to help deal with those difficult emotions. “National Anger Awareness Month is all about learning to take control of your behaviour. Everyone feels angry at some time; what matters is what you choose to do with it”   Keep Your Cool Over Yule Kit As part of Anger Awareness Month (December 2014), we are giving away our updated Keep Your...

Readers Digest Article – 1001 Things To Know, Anger

  In most cases, counting to ten really does work. A brief pause gives us just enough time to regain a sense of proportion, remember not to take things personally or even (gulp!) acknowledge that we’re not always right. But for some people, it’s not enough. “Most of the clients I have are successful business people who use anger to intimidate others,” says Mike Fisher of the British Association of Anger Management. “Eventually it gets out of hand, and colleagues and family tell them they have to change. “Around 20 per cent of my clients, by contrast, are angry because they’re not successful—but feel they should be. They often internalise their anger and become depressed.” So it’s not just the victims of our rage who suffer: feeling constantly angry is bad for us too. One in five relationships breaks down because of problems with anger; angry men are three times likelier to have heart disease than those who are rarely riled. To reduce anger levels, Fisher suggests monitoring stress and prioritising our own needs when we feel under pressure. “It’s not selfish, it’s self-preservation,” he says. Avoid using aggressive language— swearing for sure—but also blaming others, interrupting and shouting. “Instead of ‘why don’t you/you never/you should’, say ‘I feel hurt or angry’,” says Fisher.   “It’s important to admit how you feel, so don’t pretend everything’s fine when it’s not. And if that’s not enough, walk away before you do something you’ll...

Make Stress Your Friend, Not Your Enemy

Mike Fisher, Europe’s foremost Guru on Anger and Stress sent me a link to a video the other day which has opened my eyes to the way I see stress. For too long I’ve been looking for methods and techniques which will beat my stress into submission. I’ve been told that chronic stress is bad for my health, that it leads to insomnia, high blood pressure and depression, amongst many more symptoms I could mention. If ever I feel my anger rising, I’ve been taught to relax and count to ten, ‘Imagine yourself on a desert island with the warm surf lapping at your feet’, a stress expert would recite on youtube as he beckons the audience to close their eyes and feel the stress recede. And then along comes a pretty lady who blows it all away. Health psychologist Kelly McGonigal is seen delivering a TED Global sponsored talk to a packed audience in Edinburgh. After opening with her fear that she’s been teaching a method of beating stress over the last ten years, which “has been doing more harm than good,” she lays it on the line, “I’ve changed my mind about stress, and today I want to change yours.” She cites scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who have shown that the ‘perception’ of stress effects health. Hence, thinking that stress is bad for you makes it bad for you. For example if someone is making a life style choice between a stressful job and a not so stressful job, it doesn’t matter which way they go. It is in fact equally wise to choose the...
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